Habitat Restoration

Newsletter

Seaworthy News: Fall 2020

Check out our Fall 2020 Newsletter! This edition included topics on sustainable energy, transparency, fostering relationships between students and ships, […]

Education News, Member & Industry News

USCG Auxiliary Division 9 Adopts a Shoreline

On 03 March, three members of Division 9, braved a brisk and windy but sunny morning to pick up trash and litter along a segment of shoreline at the New Hope Overlook ramps on Jordan Lake.  Perry Taylor, 09-11, Sankey Blanton, 09-08, and Jim Frei, 09-11 spent about 90 minutes tromping through shrubs, woods, riprap, and briers retrieving trash that accumulates along the shoreline.  With high winds blowing directly into the cove, a big load of trash was expected, but a lot less was found.  This same segment of shoreline was picked over last November when the lake level was down four feet, so a lot of trash had already been removed.  Only three bags were collected during this event.  We have observed that less trash is accumulating along this shoreline over the past several years.  However, we are still seeing too much styrofoam.  The Division 9 segment does not get a lot of bank fishermen, so we don’t see much abandoned fishing line or plastic bait cups.

Strange to think that a little straw can be threatening. . .

Education News

Carbon Sequestration and the Ocean: How will our waters react?

Carbon sequestration, ocean acidification, and global climate change: these are just a few complex processes associated with the carbon cycle and ultimately, the future of our environment. More familiar and accessible to the general public, however, is the fact that the amount of atmospheric carbon, a primary driver of climate change, is steadily on the rise in today’s world. Questions and concerns on the future of our planet develop when we begin to contemplate what consequences will arise as a result of this increased carbon. How will nature react?

Member & Industry News

Sturgeon: Dinosaurs in the Hudson River?

Once upon a time, sturgeon the size of school buses roamed the oceans, seas, and rivers of the world. Huso huso is the largest and now the rarest species of sturgeon, growing on average to about 25 feet long. Huso huso lives in the Caspian and Black Seas and it is now unclear whether the species has gone extinct in the wild or not. When the International Union for Conservation of Nature (the IUCN) last surveyed the species in 2010, the population had decreased by 90% over the past sixty years and a number of the populations had gone extinct in the wild. Most if not all individuals are now bred and raised in hatcheries.

Education News

How to Rebuild a Reef

Many threats face coral reefs today, from coral bleaching to storms to boats and anchors that break fragile coral branches.  But all hope is not lost – corals are capable of regrowth. Recently, a great deal of research has gone into understanding coral resiliency.

Corals take at least several decades for regrowth and it is a slow and steady process. Naturally, it is important for coral to have evolved the ability to rebuild and regrow because natural disasters like storms and variations in fish grazing happen all the time. The problem now is how corals can regrow in the context of human-caused environmental change. 

Education News

Restoring the Liver of New York Harbor

One billion oysters will be given a new home in New York Harbor. That’s the goal of a non-profit organization called the Billion Oyster Project (BOP). Partnering with a variety of other people, including schools, restaurants, and the general public, BOP is planning on restoring the vast oyster reefs which used to single-handedly filter all of the water in New York Harbor.

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