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Maritime Art Contest for K-12 Students

Students in grades K–12 are invited to participate in the annual calendar art contest sponsored by the North American Marine Environment Protection Association (NAMEPA), the United States Coast Guard (USCG), and the Inter-American Committee on Ports of the Organization of American States (CIP-OAS). The theme of this year’s contest aligns with that of IMO’s World Maritime Day, “Better Shipping for a Better Future.”  Submissions will be accepted from youth across the Americas (North America, Central America, South America and the Caribbean).

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Fostering Knowledge and Skills to Succeed in Marine Conservation and Industry

NAMEPA is teaming up with local high schools to spread knowledge and share opportunities with students interested in careers in the maritime industry and environmental conservation. NAMEPA’s mission is unique as it bridges the gap between commerce and preservation, making NAMEPA a quintessential example of the dynamic positions available in the field of marine science and maritime industries.

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Tranquility Interrupted

When one goes on a seaside vacation, one looks forward to a relaxing time complete with a stroll on idyllic beaches.  Unfortunately, this wasn't the case during a weekend visit to Block Island where an invigorating walk turned into a beach cleanup. 

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A Year of Conservation Education

“What defines an invasive species? Are humans an invasive species?”, one of my students asked me during lunch. Earlier that day he had asked a similar question in front of the whole group, but I had responded that we didn’t have enough time to get into a long debate about the contentious definition of an invasive species. I said that if he wanted, we could debate whether or not humans were an invasive species over lunch.

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What Will Power Shipping in 2050?

In the KNect365  blog post last year: “12 experts evaluate the shipping industry's potential to go green” we discussed shipping’s potential to meet the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap. 2020 isn’t very far away, so the question arises - what are shipping companies actually doing right now? How many ships are actually using LNG? Are any commercial ships using biofuels, or wind?

Luckily, the answer comes to us from Dr. Nishatabbas Rehmatulla. In a paper published in January 2016, Dr. Rehmatulla and his team at University College London Energy Institute along with IMarEST, RINA and the MEPC surveyed 275 shipping companies representing 5,500 ships (or 20% of the wetbulk, drybulk and container industry). Just 1.5% of shipping companies said they were using LNG, .2% Biofuels, and .1% Solar. None of the companies that responded were using Wind Power, Kites, Sails or Flettner Rotors.

I asked several experts in the industry, including Dr. Rehmatulla, which alternative fuel they thought would see the largest growth by 2050. Will LNG remain on top of the heap – or will the recent highly publicized Norsepower/Maersk Tankers wind propulsion collaboration lead the way for commercial shipping to embrace wind shipping? 

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Marina Cleanup Day: Collaboration and Pollution Prevention

     268,940 tons of plastic float through the world’s oceans, spreading, accumulating, and being swallowed or absorbed. A group of researchers led by Markus Eriksen of the Five Gyres Institute in LA made this estimate in 2014. 5.25 trillion plastic particles are sitting in the ocean, they wrote in their paper, which was the first ever estimate for the total amount of plastic in the ocean.

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Carbon Sequestration and the Ocean: How will our waters react?

Carbon sequestration, ocean acidification, and global climate change: these are just a few complex processes associated with the carbon cycle and ultimately, the future of our environment. More familiar and accessible to the general public, however, is the fact that the amount of atmospheric carbon, a primary driver of climate change, is steadily on the rise in today’s world. Questions and concerns on the future of our planet develop when we begin to contemplate what consequences will arise as a result of this increased carbon. How will nature react?

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Earth Day Part II: Current events and what you can do this Earth Day

One of the things we all have in common as citizens of Earth is our dependence on the it and on fully functioning ecosystems. Earth Day is about making sure that we can continue to depend on these processes, both for their intrinsic and their economic value. In the age of climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction, an age scientists have literally termed the anthropocene, which means “the age of the human”, Earth Day is more important than ever.

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