Author name: Meghan Reilly

Education News, Member & Industry News

How Ballast Water is Affecting the Maritime Industry and Marine Environment Today

Ballast water is one of the most prominent topics in the maritime industry today. It spans the shipping industry, the environmental community, and the actions of maritime industry policymakers. Because it is so far reaching, it is important to understand not only what ballast water is, but how it affects the marine environment and maritime industry.

Education News

UNCW NAMEPA celebrates World Ocean Day!

The University of North Carolina at Wilmington’s newly formed chapter of UNCW NAMEPA helped celebrate World Ocean Day at a special event on campus June 8th. UNCW NAMEPA’s leadership participated in the event to help educate families in the community. We had a great time with the families who came to this special event! We were able to teach people of all ages how long certain types of trash remain in the ocean by having them play a matching game thanks to supplies provided by NAMEPA and Marine Quest.

Education News

A Year of Conservation Education

“What defines an invasive species? Are humans an invasive species?”, one of my students asked me during lunch. Earlier that day he had asked a similar question in front of the whole group, but I had responded that we didn’t have enough time to get into a long debate about the contentious definition of an invasive species. I said that if he wanted, we could debate whether or not humans were an invasive species over lunch.

Member & Industry News

What Will Power Shipping in 2050?

In the KNect365  blog post last year: “12 experts evaluate the shipping industry’s potential to go green” we discussed shipping’s potential to meet the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap. 2020 isn’t very far away, so the question arises – what are shipping companies actually doing right now? How many ships are actually using LNG? Are any commercial ships using biofuels, or wind?

Luckily, the answer comes to us from Dr. Nishatabbas Rehmatulla. In a paper published in January 2016, Dr. Rehmatulla and his team at University College London Energy Institute along with IMarEST, RINA and the MEPC surveyed 275 shipping companies representing 5,500 ships (or 20% of the wetbulk, drybulk and container industry). Just 1.5% of shipping companies said they were using LNG, .2% Biofuels, and .1% Solar. None of the companies that responded were using Wind Power, Kites, Sails or Flettner Rotors.

I asked several experts in the industry, including Dr. Rehmatulla, which alternative fuel they thought would see the largest growth by 2050. Will LNG remain on top of the heap – or will the recent highly publicized Norsepower/Maersk Tankers wind propulsion collaboration lead the way for commercial shipping to embrace wind shipping? 

Education News, Member & Industry News

Marina Cleanup Day: Collaboration and Pollution Prevention

     268,940 tons of plastic float through the world’s oceans, spreading, accumulating, and being swallowed or absorbed. A group of researchers led by Markus Eriksen of the Five Gyres Institute in LA made this estimate in 2014. 5.25 trillion plastic particles are sitting in the ocean, they wrote in their paper, which was the first ever estimate for the total amount of plastic in the ocean.

Education News

Carbon Sequestration and the Ocean: How will our waters react?

Carbon sequestration, ocean acidification, and global climate change: these are just a few complex processes associated with the carbon cycle and ultimately, the future of our environment. More familiar and accessible to the general public, however, is the fact that the amount of atmospheric carbon, a primary driver of climate change, is steadily on the rise in today’s world. Questions and concerns on the future of our planet develop when we begin to contemplate what consequences will arise as a result of this increased carbon. How will nature react?

Education News

Earth Day Part II: Current events and what you can do this Earth Day

One of the things we all have in common as citizens of Earth is our dependence on the it and on fully functioning ecosystems. Earth Day is about making sure that we can continue to depend on these processes, both for their intrinsic and their economic value. In the age of climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction, an age scientists have literally termed the anthropocene, which means “the age of the human”, Earth Day is more important than ever.

Education News

Earth Day: A brief history

Each year, April 22nd is a reminder of the responsibility we have to be stewards of the planet on which we live. Earth Day reminds us of the environmental issues that may not always be at the forefront of all conversations. But how did it start? And who do we have to thank for bringing environmental issues into the national spotlight?

Member & Industry News

Sturgeon: Dinosaurs in the Hudson River?

Once upon a time, sturgeon the size of school buses roamed the oceans, seas, and rivers of the world. Huso huso is the largest and now the rarest species of sturgeon, growing on average to about 25 feet long. Huso huso lives in the Caspian and Black Seas and it is now unclear whether the species has gone extinct in the wild or not. When the International Union for Conservation of Nature (the IUCN) last surveyed the species in 2010, the population had decreased by 90% over the past sixty years and a number of the populations had gone extinct in the wild. Most if not all individuals are now bred and raised in hatcheries.

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